Posted by & filed under Como aprender idiomas con música y los medios, Susanna's TV interviews.

Cada lunes en mi segmento titulado “El idioma es música” en el programa “Al Despertar” en San Francisco, doy mis consejos de como aprender inglés mediante la música y los medios. Canal 14 (Univision) desde las 6 a 7 am y en canal 20 (Telefutura) en el programa de las 7 a 8 am. I have my own segment in Spanish on the Al Despertar morning show on Univision San Francisco called “El idioma es música” where I give tips on learning English with songs and the media. “Al Despertar” airs on Univision/Telefutura San Francisco every Monday on both the 6-7am (Channel 14) and 7-8am (Channel 20) shows. Mis ultimos videos (My latest videos): Como evitar errores comunes en inglés con la canción “People are strange” Como pronunciar la “B” y la “V” en inglés mediante la canción “New York, New York” Pronunciación de la TH en inglés en la canción “For the longest time” Aprender inglés viendo televisión y películas

Posted by & filed under How to learn languages with songs and the media, Multilingual women.

Last week, for International Women’s Day, I wrote a blog post, How we all benefit when women are multilingual about the scarcity of female language bloggers and You Tube polyglots on the Fluent in Three Months website along with a video of a Skype call I made with two other female polyglots, Fasulye and Jana Fadness, about encouraging female language learners. Why are role models important for women learning languages? I didn’t need a role model to learn the languages I did. When I started posting videos on my You Tube channel, I was oblivious to other people on the Internet who were showing their language skills online. Just because I didn’t need a role model or someone motivating me doesn’t mean that others might not benefit from seeing more women posting videos, blogs or audio podcasts of their language abilities. When the majority of Internet polyglots are male, some of whom are competitive or who leave unprofessional or nasty comments about other polyglots or language learners on the Internet, women may be discouraged from posting their videos or displaying their languages in other ways. Role models inspire people not to give up. Since Jeremy Lin of the Knicks basketball… Read more »

Posted by & filed under How to learn languages with songs and the media, Susanna's podcast/radio interviews.

I interviewed (Don Blanquito) and Idahosa Ness about how they, as native English speakers, create rap, funk and hip hop music in Spanish and Portuguese. They also discuss how music helps people get into the flow of their new language. Don Blanquito lives in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, where he gives concerts in Portuguese. He also raps in Spanish. I found out about him in the article, Californian With an M.B.A. Follows His Heart to Brazilian Funk. Idahosa Ness speaks Chinese, Spanish and Portuguese and has created the Mimic Method for language learners to acquire the flow of their new language and get the right pronunciation by using music in their target language. Idahosa posted a guest article in Fluent in Three Months last December titled, The “flow” of fluency: How to freestyle rap in a foreign language about his method to teach people to learn the rhythm and flow of their new language before learning the structure. Given that I also promote learning the musicality of one’s new tongue first, Ness’ method resonated with me. I was very happy to interview both of these men because the exemplify the power of music to get us deep into our new languages.

Posted by & filed under How to learn languages with songs and the media, Multilingual identity.

I highly recommend the book, Babel No More. It’s a fun read as it’s written like a detective story and you can feel the passion for languages that the hyperglots demonstrate. Why I read Babel No More First there was Michael Erard’s opinion article in the New York Times about how monolingual Americans really are and then there was Nataly Kelly’s interview with Erard in The Huffington Post about Erard’s new book, Babel No More, about how hyperpolyglots can speak so many languages. I became curious what the book was about. Hyperpolyglot? I had never heard the term before. But once I read the Huffington Post article, I realized that I am a hyperpolyglot because I speak seven languages. By definition, a hyperpolyglot knows more than six languages. (Knowing a language may not mean the person can speak the language on demand. He or she may be able to read and write in the language better than understand it spoken or be able to speak it.) Once I read in the Huffington Post that a common strain amongst these super language learners was that they had visual-spatial disabilities, I knew I had to read the book. Then I saw my fellow… Read more »

Posted by & filed under Free Language Learning Resources, How to learn languages with songs and the media, Susanna's podcast/radio interviews.

The problem facing anyone going from Spanish to Portuguese is to mistake similar words or sentence structures to be the same. They are not. I am speaking from experience. I also have to catch myself from using Spanish in my Portuguese. Luciana Lage from Street Smart Brazil and I are making a series of videos on how to learn Portuguese via songs. Our latest video on the song, Eu vou estar by Capital Inicial, focuses on common mistakes Spanish speakers make in Portuguese. The blog post accompanying the video with a link to the song lyrics is on the Street Smart Brazil site. Here’s the video:

Posted by & filed under Como aprender idiomas con música y los medios, How to learn languages with songs and the media, Multilingual identity.

(My country is the Portuguese language. Fernando Pessoa) The idea of feeling an affinity with a language is not foreign to me given that I speak seven languages and have studied ten. In fact, my likes and dislikes for the sounds of languages have repelled me from certain languages and attracted me to others. But as my daily life crosses between several languages, I don’t feel particularly at home in just one language. Actually, my homeland is the multi-dimensionality of my linguistic world. If I could speak one sentence in one language and then a sentence or word in another and switch back and forth all day from language to language, I’d be at my best. But then few would understand me. Finding home in one particular language Recently, I’ve become curious about how someone can find their home in just one language. The idea first came to my attention when I was reviewing the movie “The Last Sephardi” (El ultimo sefardí) for my CNN interviews in Miami in January about the Ladino language of the Sephardic Jews that has stayed alive for over 500 years outside of Spain. In the film, there’s a conversation with Ladino speakers in Istanbul… Read more »

Posted by & filed under How to learn languages with songs and the media, Multilingual identity.

(Photo is of Lisbon, Portugal.) Feeling like I am in Portugal without leaving the United States I ventured into the Little Portugal area of San Jose, California, where the local immigrant population from the Azores islands convene around a church, a couple cafes and restaurants and a store. Oddly, I hadn’t been there for over 10 years. I say this is odd because I learned most of my Portuguese via KSQQ, the Portuguese immigrant radio station but I hadn’t been to a Portuguese community event since a fado music dinner in 2000. From movie set in Lisbon to San Jose, California Having recently re-read the book, Sostiene Pereira (Afirma Pereira in Portuguese and Pereira Declares in English), by Antonio Tabucchi in the original Italian, set in Lisbon in 1938 when the António de Oliveira Salazar dictatorship was setting nationalist policies and censuring the press, I had a strong desire to be in a Portuguese environment and experience a bit of the café culture described in the novel. (I’ve also seen the movie, starring Marcello Mastroanni, many years ago and am getting a group of my friends together to watch it in Italian.) A journalist/translator, Pereira, thinks he can live his… Read more »

Posted by & filed under Como aprender idiomas con música y los medios, How to learn languages with songs and the media, Susanna's TV interviews.

Learning languages with music, preserving the Ladino languages with songs, CALA CNN, February 10, 2012 On Friday February 10, 2012, the CALA show on CNN interviewed Montserrat Franco and I in Spanish about how to learn foreign languages using music, why it’s important to be multilingual, how the ancient Ladino language of the Spanish Jews saved a boy’s life in the Holocaust and how Sephardic Jews maintained their language, Ladino, outside of Spain for over 500 years. I introduced my book, El idioma es música, and Montserrat delighted us by singing a Ladino song and speaking a bit in Ladino. Both Montserrat and I speak seven languages each and we believe firmly in the power of music to teach us foreign languages. Despite the tragedy of the Bosnian War, people in Sarajevo held music concerts during the way to keep their spirits up. The human spirit is indeed stronger than politics. Music feeds the soul and also keeps us in touch with our roots and learning foreign languages.

Posted by & filed under Como aprender idiomas con música y los medios, How to learn languages with songs and the media, Susanna's TV interviews.

Susanna Zaraysky, políglota y autora de “El idioma es música” explica cómo se puede estudiar lenguas con música y los medios de comunicación. Susanna cuenta su experiencia viviendo en Bosnia después de la guerra de Yugoslavia y como el idioma ladino salvó la vida de Moris Albahari, un joven bosnio judío en la segunda guerra mundial. Montserrat Franco habla 7 idiomas y canta en ladino (idioma de los judíos sefardíes). Ellas muestran cómo la música ladina ayuda a conservar el idioma de los judíos de origen español. Entrevista con Ismael Cala en el program CALA en CNN en Español, el 10 de febrero 2012.